JuiceBox


Why Juice?

Making fresh juice a part of a well-balanced, plant-based diet is an important tool for achieving good health.

Calorie reduction without nutrient deprivation
Promotion of healthy eating habits
Delicious way to consume fresh produce
Floods the body with micronutrients

Juicing offers many life-enhancing health benefits including a faster, more efficient way to absorb immune boosting nutrients naturally found in fruits and vegetables.  It provides a way to access digestive enzymes typically locked away in the fiber matrix of whole fruits and vegetables.  Most commercial juices are processed and lacking in nutrition while freshly juiced fruits and vegetables are loaded with an abundance of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients.

Drinking fresh juice can help us adopt healthier eating patterns.  For those of us who do not traditionally consume many fruits and vegetables, incorporating fresh juice can be a fun and different approach to increasing consumption of these important plant foods for improved health and wellness and reaching your weight loss goals.

“Juice is too sugary” or “It won’t fill me up” are some common things we hear from skeptics. We debunk these and other juicing myths in The Top 11 Juicing Myths Busted.









What makes juice so special?

Juicing removes the insoluble fiber from vegetables and fruits. While fiber is an established, important part of an overall healthy diet, removing the insoluble fiber allows for increased absorption of specific health promoting phytonutrients including enzymes, while the soluble fiber persists into the juice.  By removing the fibers and consuming fruits and vegetables in liquid form, we are providing a nutrient delivery system to our bodies that allows individuals who would otherwise have difficulty consuming whole vegetables, the opportunity to reap the numerous benefits vegetables have to offer.

 

Make a double batch. Make more than one juice, have half right away, and then store the rest for your juice later that day or the following day. This will help ensure you get the most potent juice possible for at least one serving.
Store in the fridge. Juice will keep for 24-48 hours in the fridge (72 hours is maximum time suggested). If you are traveling bring your juice in a cooler.
Keep in airtight container. Store your juice in an airtight container, preferably glass but BPA-free plastic works too.
Fill container full.  Fill juice to the top of your preferred container to prevent oxygen from getting in which can deplete the nutrients.
Freeze.Freezing is also an option but less desirable than refrigeration. If you do freeze your juice do it immediately after juicing. Thaw in the refrigerator and drink within 7-10 days of freezing.
Store in the correct environment. The juice should be stored in a dark, cool environment away from heat and light.

 

By: Joe Cross

One of the most common questions people ask me is “Joe, what is the difference between juicing and blending?” Now, you might think the difference is obvious – but it turns out there’s a lot of confusion about the two, and many people believe they are juicing when in fact they are blending. So, let’s clear things up!

When juicing, the machine extracts the juice (this is the water and most of the nutrients the produce contains), leaving behind the pulp. When blending, there is no left-over pulp. Blenders pulverize the whole produce to make a smoothie.

What can make this confusing is that these machines all use different names. If you see the term “Nutrition Extractor™”, for example, how do you know if you are juicing or blending? Simply ask yourself the question: is the machine removing the pulp? If not, it’s not juicing!

But Joe, which one is better?

The short answer is, I love both.

I look at it this way: we all need plenty of fresh vegetables and fruit in our diet, whether we eat, juice, or blend them. They are nutrient dense powerhouses, and however we choose to take them in – it’s all good!

Juicing and blending are both great ways to include a lot of produce in our diet, and also to consume a greater variety than we may otherwise eat. But they are different and it is important to understand why.

When you juice you are removing the insoluble fiber – the pulp. Don’t get me wrong. Fiber is good for you. It keeps your digestive tract healthy and it slows down the absorption of sugar. But it also slows down the absorption of nutrients and some nutrients stay in the fiber. When you juice, you are extracting up to 70% of the nutrition right into your glass1, and without the insoluble fiber your body absorbs 100% of these nutrients.

Take a look at the ingredients you use next time you make a Mean Green juice for example, and imagine eating that as a huge bowl of salad at every meal – you’d be chewing all day! Even in smoothie, that’s a lot of produce to consume.

Still concerned about fiber? One of our Reboot nutritionists, Claire, has written a great post explaining the facts about fiber and juicing.

On a Reboot, which is best?

You have two options when selecting a Reboot plan: juice only, or juice plus eating an exclusively fruit and vegetable diet. Both are great, and which you choose will depend on your goals and your current state of health.

If you are Rebooting for health reasons, or have modest weight loss goals, an eating Reboot may be a better option. However, if you are Rebooting because you have moderate to high weight loss goals, a juicing Reboot is a better option. When you juice only, you tend to lose weight more rapidly.

I’m frequently asked “Can I use my blender/Vitamix/NutriBullet on a Reboot?” You can, but if you do so you are doing an ‘eating’ Reboot: the plan you follow will be different, the juice recipes will need to be modified (they are a created for a juicer!), and the results you see may also be different.

By Joe cross

www.rebootwithjoe.com